Community Benefit Advocates Call on Senate to Reject House Bill 4052

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
News from the Equitable Detroit Coalition 
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
Community Benefit Advocates Call on Senate to Reject House Bill 4052
Coalition opposes stripping power to form community benefit agreements
DETROIT — The Equitable Detroit Coalition, a coalition of community members and groups advocating for a community benefits ordinance in Detroit, called on the Senate today to reject HB 4052. The group says the legislation would prevent the forming of community benefit agreements in Detroit.
HB 4052 passed in the House of Representatives last week after being fast tracked out of a committee the day before.
“This bill is dangerous and will send Michigan backwards,” said Rev. Joan Ross, director of the North End Woodward Community Coalition. “Proponents of this bill claim that community benefit ordinances would not be affected yet the bill prohibits wage requirements higher than the state’s minimum wage as well as requirements for apprenticeships and training programs, all of which are integral to community benefit agreements. The Senate should reject this bill.”
The coalition has been working with local officials and community leaders to ensure that citizens have input in large developments in the city that receive a substantial amount of tax dollars.
“I find it appalling that our elected officials in Lansing continue to attack the right of local elected officials to make decisions in the best interest of their communities,” Ross continued. “Local governments have been the champion for many policies that help residents and workers. Policies such as paid sick leave, living wage ordinances, and local hiring practices would be eliminated under this legislation and that is unacceptable. This bill would only hurt our communities at a time when we should be doing all we can do to help them heal.”
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The mission of the Equitable Detroit Coalition is to foster beneficial relationships between developers and the Detroit community by facilitating open and honest dialogue and to assist developers funded by public dollars to become corporate neighbors who are transparent in their relationship with the community. For more information, please visit http://www.equitabledetroit.org.

Call to ACTION! Demand an Apology from Michael Finney, Governor Snyder’s Economic Growth Advisor

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Call to ACTION!
Please read the Free Press article, the response from EDC member William Hickey sent to the editor and contact the Governor (517.335.7858, https://www.facebook.com/GovernorRickSnyder, @onetoughnerd) to demand an apology from Mr. Finney. We need to let them know that we will respond to these unwarranted attacks on Detroiters as it relates to our right to be included in the economic resurgence in this community.

“It’s hard to be shocked by anything that comes out of Governor Snyder’s administration regarding Detroit, but it’s the only word I can think of after reading comments made by Michael Finney, his economic growth adviser, to a recent meeting of the Detroit Economic Club. John Gallagher reported that Mr. Finney dismissed community benefits agreements (the subject of an ordinance proposed by Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones) by asserting, “We need to be capitalists.  Entitlements hurt us.”  Really?  Have the tax credits, zoning changes, real estate fire sales, access to power, set asides, and other development tools that I’m sure Mr. Finney would say big business is “entitled” to hurt the capitalists he refers to?  Not at all.  It’s only when those citizen-neighbors who have been trying to hold together their communities in Detroit for decades have the nerve to think they might be entitled to a say in what kind of development comes into their neighborhoods, and to negotiate (not demand or impose) some tangible benefits from developers (jobs for the community, no damage to the environment, mitigation of negative impact on local small businesses, etc.), that “entitlement” becomes a dirty word.  There is more than irony here.  There is also an ugly attempt to divide our city and state along racial and economic lines with code words like “entitlements.””
______________________

http://www.freep.com/story/money/business/michigan/2015/01/08/finney-miller-snyder/21456641/

Finney, Miller call for economic reforms

By John Gallagher, Detroit Free Press, January 8, 2015

Both men said they opposed a proposal to require community benefits agreements in Detroit.

Two of Michigan’s top economic leaders gave a generally upbeat outlook for the state Thursday but called for reforms dealing with road repairs, education, and immigration.

Michael Finney, senior adviser on economic growth for Gov. Rick Snyder, and Rodrick Miller, president and CEO of the Detroit Economic Growth Corp., kicked off the 2015 season of the Detroit Economic Club with remarks before a crowd of several hundred at MotorCity Casino.

Prior to their remarks, Margaret Baker of Baker Strategy Group delivered the findings of her latest survey of business leaders in the state, which showed that 71% planned to hire new staffers this year, a generally upbeat level. But those same business leaders showed strong concerns over the condition of roads and bridges, talent development, and schools.

Finney said the tax and budget reforms of Snyder’s first administration took advantage of the economic expansion that followed the Great Recession to produce Michigan’s improving economy. “It’s important to be ready when the opportunity is there,” he said.

And Miller, who joined DEGC a few months ago from a similar role in New Orleans, said it’s important that Detroit ensure that the current redevelopment surge in the greater downtown will benefit all residents, not just a few. “How do we expand the economic pie and economic opportunity in the city of Detroit?” he said.

Both men opposed a proposal, now being studied by Detroit City Council, to require developers who receive incentives for projects to negotiate community benefits agreements with residential groups. Miller said it would add a layer of bureaucracy to an already complex development process, requiring developers to deal with “autonomous groups not responsible to anybody.”

Finney agreed, saying it would be more productive to look for ways to generate economic development in the neighborhoods rather than forcing developers to deliver “entitlements.”

“We need to be capitalists,” he said. “Entitlements hurt us.”

Finney, like his boss Snyder, called for reform of the nation’s immigration laws to allow more highly educated and high-skilled workers to come here and to stay in Michigan after receiving degrees. “It’s beyond comprehension we don’t have a good immigration strategy,” he said.

Call to ACTION: Contact the Governor to demand an apology from Mr. Finney

Phone: 517.335.7858
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GovernorRickSnyder
Twitter: @onetoughnerd

THANK YOU!

Common Sense for Detroit: Why the Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance Will Spur Inclusive Development

Common Sense for Detroit: Why the Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance Will Spur Inclusive Development

Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

Economic growth and equity and inclusion can go hand in hand. With Detroit’s proposed Community Benefits Agreement ordinance, the city has the chance to join the ranks of other municipalities that have embraced this effective tool to improve the well-being of both its businesses and residents. Large developments inevitably affect their communities. It’s simply common sense to ensure that those effects are positive.

Community Benefit Agreements (CBAs) successfully address a very real, endemic problem by making sure that economic growth is shared and that communities hosting large developments have a seat at the negotiating table.

While traditional development projects almost always generate benefits, benefits are too often neither inclusive nor fairly distributed, which means development cannot enrich an entire region. Such policies are a result of a lack of proactive thinking about equity, not malicious intent. Many development plans inadvertently favor larger, better resourced firms and communities. For instance, research I conducted on the distribution of Recovery Act funding revealed that, despite its intent to boost economies across the country, African American firms and workers were disproportionately left out. This had much to do with the fact that African American communities had fewer “shovel-ready” projects. Additionally, during the recession, more small and minority-owned firms went out of business, lost bonding, or lost insurance. These additional barriers hindered their ability to compete.

The economic benefits of CBAs are well-documented. Developers operating with CBAs make major investments in workforce training, affordable housing, and other invaluable community assets that increase local tax revenue while decreasing strain on taxpayer-funded programs. CBAs integrate substantially higher percentages of local and disadvantaged workers, underrepresented racial and ethnic groups, microenterprises, and small businesses. This can reduce gaps in income and wealth and increase the likelihood that a rise in the cost of living is accompanied by greater income, which reduces displacement in communities. In addition, CBAs that reflect the vision of a broad set of community stakeholders reassure developers, investors, and officials that projects will be supported and obtain timely approvals. This saves money and fosters trust by clarifying the metrics by which development projects will be judged.

Community benefits policies are especially essential for older industrial cities. For instance, Milwaukee standardized its requests for proposal process so it favors bidders who create construction training and apprenticeship opportunities, hire local residents, use green building principles, include affordable housing, and put disadvantaged businesses to work.

Reducing inequality isn’t simply about morality and social inclusion. It is essential for economic growth. As researchers at the International Monetary Fund put it, “it would still be a mistake to focus on growth and let inequality take care of itself, not only because inequality may be ethically undesirable but also because the resulting growth may be low and unsustainable.”

Around 80 cities have included CBAs in major developments, and some 50 more are in the works across the country. Detroit’s unique Community Benefits Agreement ordinance, however, would make history. It has the potential to set Detroit on a path not just to recovery, but to renaissance. We strongly encourage the city council to adopt this legislation.

Professor john powell
Director of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society
University of California at Berkeley

Julie Nelson
Director of the Government Alliance on Race and Equity
Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

CBA Ordinance Draft, 3rd Revision 10-30-14

Download Draft: 3Revs.FinalDRAFTLaw.LPD_CBAO_-_10-30-14

S U M M A R Y
AN ORDINANCE to amend Chapter 14 of the 1984 Detroit City Code, Community Development, by adding Article XII, titled Community Benefits, which consists of Sections 14-12-1 through 14-12-7, to provide for the purpose and applicability of this article; to provide for definitions of terms used in this article; to require provision of Community Benefits and executed Community Benefits Agreements for certain development projects seeking public support for investment above certain threshold levels; to provide for exemptions for applicability of the article, and to provide for penalties and enforcement of the article.BY COUNCIL MEMBER__________________________________________:

AN ORDINANCE to amend Chapter 14 of the 1984 Detroit City Code, Community Development, by adding Article XII, titled Community Benefits, which consists of Sections 14-12-1 through 14-12-7, to provide for the purpose and applicability of this article; to provide for definitions of terms used in this article; to require provision of Community Benefits and executed Community Benefits Agreements for certain development projects seeking public support for investment above certain threshold levels; to provide for exemptions for applicability of the article, and to provide for penalties and enforcement of the article.

IT IS HEREBY ORDAINED BY THE PEOPLE OF THE CITY OF DETROIT THAT:
Section 1.  Chapter 14 of the 1984 Detroit City Code, Community Development, is amended by adding Article XII, Community Benefits, which consists of Sections 14-12-1 through 14-12-7, to read as follows:

CHAPTER 14.   COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
ARTICLE XII. Community Benefits

Sec. 14-12-1.     Purpose; Title

(a)    It shall be the policy of the City of Detroit to require, wherever feasible, proportional community benefits as a condition of significant public support for development in the form of subsidies, tax abatements, below-market priced land, or other enhanced public resources.
(b)    This article shall be known as the “Detroit Community Benefits Ordinance.”

Sec. 14-12-2.     Definitions

(a)    “Community Benefits” means the amenities, benefits, commitments, or promises described in Section 14-12-3(a)(1)b. and in Section 14-12-4.
(b)     “Community Benefits Agreement” means the agreement(s) negotiated and agreed to as set forth in Section 14-12-3(a)(1).
(c)    “Contractor” means any person, firm, partnership, limited liability company, corporation, joint venture, proprietorship, or other entity that enters into a contract for performance of construction work on the development project within the Host Community, including subcontractors of any tier.
(d)    “Detroit Business” shall mean any of the following businesses, as defined in Section 18-5-1 of this code:

(1)    Detroit-based business
(2)    Detroit-based micro business concern
(3)    Detroit-based small business
(4)    Detroit-headquartered business
(5)    Detroit-resident business.

(e)    “Development Agreement” means, for the purposes of this Article, the agreement or agreements between the City and the developer pursuant to which the City provides or commits Public Support For Investment for a Tier 1 Development Project, Tier 2 Development Project, or High Impact Development Project, regardless of the label or title affixed to such agreement.
(f)    “First Source Hiring Program” means a collaborative partnership between the developer, the City of Detroit and an appropriate workforce development agency that, to the extent consistent with federal and state law, includes provisions to promote the hiring, training, and employability of residents and displaced workers from the Host Community, including both construction and permanent jobs in connection with a project.
(g)    “High Impact Development Project” means any development project that, because of the nature of the development and/or the Host Community, is reasonably expected to produce disproportionately high and adverse human health or environmental impacts, including social, esthetic, economic, physical, chemical, or biological impacts, in the Host Community. Determination of whether a project is a High Impact Development Project shall be made by City Council as set forth in Section 14-12-3(a)(3).
(h)    “Host Community” means the community within the census tract(s) where the development project is physically located and may also include communities within adjacent census tracts that may be adversely affected by the activities of the development project, as determined by agreement among members of the Host Community representative party to a Community Benefits Agreement, but shall in no case be smaller than the census tract where the development project is physically located.
(i)    “Public Support For Investment” means either or both of:

(1)    direct or indirect transfer to the developer of city-owned land parcels that have a cumulative market value of Three Hundred Thousand Dollars ($300,000) or more (as determined by the City Assessor or independent appraisal), without open bidding or priced below market rates (where allowed by law); or
(2)    Provision or approval by the City of other forms of public subsidies to the developer, including but not limited to tax abatements or grants, that are cumulatively valued at Three Hundred Thousand Dollars ($300,000) or more, but not including Neighborhood Enterprise Zones.

(j)    “Tier 1 Development Project” means a development project in the City of Detroit that is expected to incur the investment of Fifteen Million Dollars ($15,000,000) or more during the construction of facilities or plant, or to begin or expand operations or renovate structures.
(k)    “Tier 2 Development Project” means a development project in the City of Detroit that is expected to incur the investment of more than Three Million Dollars ($3,000,000), but less than Fifteen Million Dollars ($15,000,000), during the construction of facilities or plant, or to begin or expand operations or renovate structures.

Sec. 14-12-3.      Providing Community Benefits; Community Benefits Agreements; when required.

(a)    Upon submission of a site plan for a Tier 1 Development Project to the Planning and Development Department or its successor, if the developer intends to seek Public Support for Investment in the project it shall notify the department, and the department shall then forthwith request that a written notice be generated by the City Clerk’s office, informing the Host Community of the proposed project and of a scheduled organizational meeting.  The first organizational meeting for purposes of forming the Host Community representative organization to negotiate and execute a Community Benefits Agreement shall be called by the City Council Member or Members in whose district(s) the project is located.  The Council Member(s) shall schedule and call the first organizational meeting of the Host Community for purposes of forming the Host Community representative organization within twenty-one (21) days of the date of notice informing the Host Community of the proposed project.  Other than hosting that meeting, Council members and other City officials shall have no direct involvement in the processes of forming the Host Community representative or negotiating the Community Benefits Agreement.  The following standards and requirements shall apply to providing Community Benefits as a condition of receiving Public Support For Investment:

(1)    Tier 1 Development Project.

a.    For any proposed Tier 1 Development Project that requests or proposes the receipt of Public Support For Investment, the developer shall engage Host Community residents for purposes of entering into a legally enforceable Community Benefits Agreement with representative residents, businesses and nonprofit organizations, collectively comprising the Host Community representative party to the Community Benefits Agreement.
b.    The Community Benefits Agreement shall provide for Community Benefits as negotiated by the parties, and shall specifically address each of the following:

(1)    targeted benefits or appropriately negotiated employment opportunities,
(2)    job training,
(3)    low- and moderate-income housing,
(4)    quality of life or environmental mitigations,
(5)    neighborhood infrastructure and amenities, and
(6)    community representation for the benefit of the Host Community in the development and post-development processes.
Although the Community Benefits Agreement shall specifically address each of the above issues, that does not mean that the parties are required to reach an agreement providing any particular benefit, only that each of the above subjects must be recognized in the written agreement using language agreed upon by the parties.

c.    Unless good cause is shown by a developer that it should receive an exemption as provided in Section 14-12-5, the developer shall include a copy of the executed Community Benefits Agreement with the request for City Council approval of the Public Support For Investment.  Violation without good cause shown by a developer shall result in denial of approval for any such Public Support For Investment.

(2)    Tier 2 Development Project. For any proposed Tier 2 Development Project that requests or proposes the receipt of Public Support For Investment, the developer may but is not required to engage the Host Community residents to execute a Community Benefits Agreement describing the Community Benefits to be provided by the developer in the manner described by Section 14-12-3(1).  If no Community Benefits Agreement is executed, however, the developer shall adopt and implement a First Source Hiring Program, the terms of which shall be included in the Development Agreement.

(3)    High Impact Development Project. For any proposed High Impact Development Project that requests or proposes the receipt of Public Support For Investment, Detroit City Council may determine that the requirements of Section 14-12-3(a)(1) shall apply. Determination of whether a project is a High Impact Development Project shall be made by a finding of City Council expressed in a resolution, after a public hearing requested by a resident of the Host Community and duly noticed and conducted for the purpose of ascertaining whether the project meets the definition of a High Impact Development Project.  City Council may call on the assistance of the City Planning Commission, the Planning Department, and other resources to assist in its determination.  The developer and residents of the Host Community shall be entitled to speak at the public hearing.

Sec. 14-12-4.     Community Benefits

(a)    The following is a non-exclusive list of examples of Community Benefits that may be considered for inclusion in a Community Benefits Agreement, or in a Development Agreement:

(1)    A First Source Hiring Program.

(2)    A requirement that a majority or other specified percentage of Contractors retained to provide services relating to the development project will consist of Detroit Businesses or one or more categories of Detroit Businesses.

(3)    Workforce Development Programs, such as:

a.    Where specialized technical training is necessary for employment in the developer’s business, pre-apprenticeship, apprenticeship, and other training in the City’s high schools, community colleges and workforce training programs, including but not limited to agencies such as the Detroit Registered Apprenticeship Program and the Access for All apprenticeship readiness programs targeting residents of the Host Community.
b.    One or more adult pre-apprenticeship programs operated by one or more qualified administrators or an administrative collaboration comprised of organizations that benefit residents of the Host Community, including but not limited to agencies such as the Partnership for Diversity and Opportunity in Transportation.
c.    Actively supporting workforce development activities that provide employment opportunities for residents of the Host Community, including but not limited to programs through federal workforce funds received annually and allocated by agencies such as the State’s Michigan Works! partner, Detroit Employment Solutions Corporation, or another appropriate workforce development agency or entity.
d.    Providing annual Contractor readiness training for Detroit Businesses, through the United States Department of Transportation Bonding Education Program or other relevant training opportunities.
e.    Hosting annual Contractor information and networking sessions about upcoming contracting opportunities with the Michigan Department of Transportation in the City of Detroit.

(4)    Youth Employment Programs:

a.    Programs to require Contractors, subcontractors and developers to hire City youths in the Host Community, including but not limited to agencies such as Transportation and Civil Engineering (TRAC) summer internship positions to qualified Detroit youths.
b.    Providing program materials, training and support for Detroit Public Schools/CTE (DPS) or other educational institutions in the Host Community.
c.    Providing employment and career mentoring opportunities for youths who reside in the Host Community, including but not limited to the Michigan Department of Transportation’s Youth Development and Mentoring Program.

(5)    Land Use Programs:

a.    Actively promoting City real estate and investment opportunities in the Host Community through agencies such as the Michigan Prospectus or another appropriate real estate investment agency or entity.
b.    Providing additional recreational opportunities, parks, educational services, environmental amenities, housing capacity or other benefits in the Host Community.
c.    Providing funds for demolition of abandoned homes or other structures in the Host Community.

(6)    Provisions that require periodic reporting, the frequency to be determined by the parties, of activities and ongoing monitoring of compliance by the parties throughout the course of the project.

(7)    Provisions that require the parties to periodically meet and confer, the frequency to be determined by the parties, and disclose the parties’ activities and the status of compliance to Host Community residents, and that require periodic public meetings with the opportunity for input and comments by Host Community stakeholders.

(8)    A community needs assessment regarding the Host Community at the developer’s expense.

(9)    An environmental and/or public health assessment of the impacts of the proposed development at the developer’s expense.

(10)    Specified remedies for violation of the Community Benefits Agreement, which unless otherwise agreed by the parties, may include, without limitation specific performance, liquidated damages, claw backs, or revocation or withdrawal of tax abatement and public subsidies, either directly by the City of Detroit, or by application to the Michigan Tax Tribunal or Michigan Tax Commission, as provided by law.

Sec. 14-12-5.     Exemptions
(a)    The developer may request from the City Council a resolution exempting it from the requirement of entering a Community Benefits Agreement by demonstrating that:

(1)    Identifying a Host Community representative to negotiate with on behalf of the Host Community is infeasible or impractical; or
(2)    Good faith negotiations have occurred for a reasonable time period, but negotiations have reached an intractable impasse; or
(3)    Other exigencies make entering a Community Benefits Agreement infeasible in the particular instance.

(b)    To request an exemption, the developer shall

(1)    provide to the City Council in writing the basis of its request,
(2)    state with particularity the efforts made by the developer to engage the Host Community and the efforts to reach accord on a Community Benefits Agreement, and
(3)    document how it will otherwise seek to implement the purpose of this Article to provide Community Benefits.

Sec. 14-12-6.     City as Third-party Beneficiary; Development Agreement.

(a)    A Community Benefits Agreement under this Section shall include a provision that the City is an intended Third Party Beneficiary and as such the City may, in its discretion, enforce the Community Benefits Agreement.  Any Development Agreement shall include an acknowledgment by the developer of the City’s right to enforce a Community Benefits Agreement applicable to the project, and may also include commitments by the developer to the City of specific Community Benefits.  Nothing in any Development Agreement shall preclude, prevent, or otherwise limit the Host Community representative party or its successors from having standing to enforce a Community Benefits Agreement.  This subsection shall not be interpreted to change, alter, or diminish the legal and equitable duties, rights, and remedies of the parties to the Community Benefits Agreement.

Sec. 14-12-7.     Penalties for Noncompliance; Enforcement.

(a)    The provisions of this Article are prescriptive in nature, and are set forth as required conditions to request, provision, and receipt of Public Support For Investment for Tier 1 Development Projects, Tier 2 Development Projects, and High Impact Development Projects. Material failure to comply with the provisions of this Article may result in denial, suspension, termination, revocation, or withdrawal of Public Support For Investment, but shall not be subject to the penalties set forth in Sec 1-1-9 of this code. Except when obtained through substantial and material misrepresentation or fraud, the resolution of City Council approving the Public Support For Investment shall be evidence of compliance with the provisions of this Article, and thereafter remedies shall be limited to enforcement of the Community Benefits Agreement and/or Development Agreement.

Section 2.  This ordinance is hereby declared necessary to preserve the public peace, health, safety, and welfare of the People of the City of Detroit.

Section 3.  All ordinances, or parts of ordinances, that conflict with this ordinance are repealed.

Section 4.  In the event this ordinance is passed by two-thirds (2/3) majority of City Council Members serving, it shall be given immediate effect and become effective upon publication in accordance with Section 4-118 of the 2012 Detroit City Charter.  Where this ordinance is passed by less than a two-thirds (2/3) majority of City Council Members serving, it shall become effective on the thirtieth (30) day after enactment, or on the first business day thereafter, in accordance with Section 4-118 of the 2012 Detroit City Charter.

Approved as to form:

_____________________________
Melvin Butch Hollowell
Corporation Counsel

Download Draft: 3Revs.FinalDRAFTLaw.LPD_CBAO_-_10-30-14

Action Alert! Call Council, CBA Ordinance: Development that will benefit ALL Detroiters

CBAbuttonsSM Action: Call your City Council Member and Council President Brenda Jones to express your support of a strong, and legally enforceable community benefit agreement ordinance that promotes fair and just development in Detroit. (See ‘Reasons to Support’ below.)

Platform Members and Supporters,

On Friday, October 24th, the Detroit News published an article that expressed concern from Mayor Duggan’s office over the Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance that is currently being discussed and vetted by Detroit City Council. “The local law, they (Mayor Duggan’s Team) say, would be negative for Detroit if passed, creating too many hurdles that could discourage development.” These statements from the executive office reflect a recent letter to City Council sent by Detroit Economic Growth Corporation’s CEO Rodrick Miller expressing that an ordinance would “undermine progress”.

This push-back and the dismissal of the need for accountability to community around development projects by the Mayor and DEGC is an attempt to keep doing development the way we have been, business as usual, where only a few benefit. With awareness of Detroit’s long history of failed urban renewal programs and the recent outpouring of tax dollars, subsidies, public land and resources to private development projects it is challenging to witness our political and business leaders push back against both their constituents and economic reality.

Last week, Council Member Raquel Castaneda-Lopez was on Flashpoint (Video) and addressed these and other concerns over a CBA ordinance. From a October 15th Metro Times article:

“As Castaneda-Lopez puts it, cities going through a financial crisis tend to think about development in the short-term “to address the immediate crisis.” The Urban Development Agreements ordinance would change that, she says. “It creates a framework,” she says. “It’s not just a one-size fits all,” meaning it wouldn’t be all-encompassing for every project. “There are exemptions built in for different scenarios, and ultimately council can also weigh in to whether there’s a needed urban development agreement or not.”

The current way of doing development overlooks small, minority-owned business. The CBA ordinance will allow for a broader benefits which will support increased participation by small business owners, minority owned businesses, and Detroit-based businesses as well. The CBA ordinance is a good first step in the restructuring of Detroit by ensuring  meaningful participation by Detroiters in rebuilding our neighborhoods. The CBA ordinance will make sure that we as residents have that opportunity.

Corporate interests, the mainstream media, and now the Mayor, are spreading fear about the death of economic development in Detroit if a CBA Ordinance is passed. But an ordinance that benefits community will not deter equitable progress or development.  It will help to guide Detroit’s growth in a way that benefits both community and developers in the long-term rather than quick fix, trickle down, business-as-usual, development projects. Call your City Council Member and Council President Brenda Jones to express your support of a strong, and legally enforceable community benefit agreement ordinance that promotes fair and just development in Detroit. (See ‘Reasons to Support’ below.)

Reasons to Support the Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance

  •     Nearly 2000 Detroiters have signed the petition calling for a strong and enforceable Community Benefit Agreement ordinance and the number of signatures is growing.
  •     Detroiters deserve the type of economic development where all Detroiters benefit not just a few wealthy individuals and big corporations.
  •     When our tax dollars and public lands are used to benefit private investments, Detroiters deserve a strong and enforceable Community Benefit Agreement ordinance on the books to protect our interest.
  •     We call on each city council member to support a strong and enforceable community benefit agreement ordinance!

COUNCIL CONTACTS

Brenda Jones, President, 313.224.1245, bjones_mb@detroitmi.gov
George Cushingberry, Pro Tem: (313) 224-4535, cushingberryg@detroitmi.gov
Scott Benson: (313) 224-1198, bensons@detroitmi.gov
Resigned Saunteel Jenkins: (313) 224-4248, councilmemberjenkins@detroitmi.gov
Gabe Leland: (313) 224-2151 lelandg@detroitmi.gov
Raquel Castaneda-Lopez: (313) 224-2450, councilmemberraquel@detroitmi.gov
Mary Sheffield: (313) 224-4505, councilmembersheffield@detroitmi.gov
Andre Spivey: (313) 224-4841, councilmanspivey@detroitmi.gov
James Tate: (313) 224-1027, councilmembertate@detroitmi.gov

Call To Action: Community Benefits Agreement Ordinance

Community Benefits Ordinance Update: Currently special interest groups and mainstream media are mounting a full court press to bury the proposed Community Benefit Agreement ordinance that is making its way through city council. The CBA ordinance is one way to ensure that the average Detroiter will benefit from the billions of dollars, including public tax benefits, will be included in the economic development plans for this city.

•    Corporate interests and the mainstream media are spreading fear about the death of economic development if a Community Benefit Agreement ordinance is passed by Detroit City Council. A ordinance that benefits community will not deter equitable progress or development, but will help to guide Detroit’s growth in a more humane and sustainable direction.

•    The Detroit News referred to the proposed ordinance as a “Shakedown tax” (http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/editorials/2014/10/11/benefits-agreement-detroit-development/17056019/) but without an ordinance not only protecting but benefiting community is a means to stop billion dollar corporations and big businesses from bullying and shaking down Detroit citizens by using their tax dollars for personal profit without any accountability to the communities their projects effect.

•    The Detroit Economic Growth Corporation (DEGC) CEO Rodrick Miller, in a letter to City Council referred to the ordinance as a “damaging piece of legislation” sighting frustration with past deals that “went awry” but for the last 30 years in Detroit “trickle down” development deals have benefited only a few and negatively effected many.

•    The current way of doing development overlooks small, minority-owned business. The CBA ordinance will allow for a broader benefits which will support increased participation by small business owners, minority owned businesses, and Detroit-based businesses as well.

Take Action NOW!  Call your council member and let them know that you:

•    Support a strong, and legally enforceable community benefit agreement that promotes fair and just development here in Detroit.

•    That the CBA ordinance is a good first step in the restructuring of Detroit by ensuring  meaningful participation by Detroiters in rebuilding our neighborhoods – the CBA ordinance will make sure that we as residents have that opportunity.

Detroit People’s Platform members and allies please 1.) attend City Council’s Planning and Economic Development Committee meeting on Thursday, October 16 at CAYMC. Arrive at 10am for the meeting on the 13th floor. 2.) Call Detroit City Council members and demand they support and vote in favor of the ordinance.

COUNCIL CONTACTS
Brenda Jones, President: bjones_mb@detroitmi.gov
George Cushingberry, Pro Tem: (313) 224-4535, cushingberryg@detroitmi.gov
Scott Benson: (313) 224-1198, bensons@detroitmi.gov
Saunteel Jenkins: (313) 224-4248, councilmemberjenkins@detroitmi.gov
Gabe Leland: (313) 224-2151 lelandg@detroitmi.gov
Raquel Castaneda-Lopez: (313) 224-2450, councilmemberraquel@detroitmi.gov
Mary Sheffield: (313) 224-4505, councilmembersheffield@detroitmi.gov
Andre Spivey: (313) 224-4841, councilmanspivey@detroitmi.gov
James Tate: (313) 224-1027, councilmembertate@detroitmi.gov

Community Benefits Agreement: Mobilization-Call Detroit City Council!

CBAbuttons

Members of the CBA Ordinance coalition of which Peoples Platform is a member have reviewed the September 17th revised ordinance and find that it does not represent the best interest of Detroiters.  The CBA coalition has notified city council of our concerns.

We need Detroiters to call each of the council members including their District Council person and voice concerns.  Below are suggested points to include:

  • Nearly 2000 Detroiters have signed the petition calling for a strong and enforceable Community Benefit Agreement ordinance and the number of signatures is growing.
  • Detroiters deserve the type of economic development where all Detroiters benefit not just a few wealthy individuals and big corporations.
  • When our tax dollars and public lands are used to benefit private investments, Detroiters deserve a strong and enforceable Community Benefit Agreement ordinance on the books to protect our interest.

 
The September 17th draft CBA ordinance is not strong enough and does not represent the best interest of Detroiters.
 
We call on each city council member to support a strong and enforceable community benefit agreement ordinance!
 
Council Member Name and phone by district:
 
At large:  Brenda Jones Council President  313.224.1245
At Large: Saunteel Jenkins  313.224.4248
 
District 1 James Tate  313.224.1027
District 2 George Cushingberry  313.224.4535
District 3 Scott Benson  313.224.1198
District 4 Andre Spivey  313.224.4841
District 5 Mary Sheffield  313.224.4505
District 6 Raquel Castaneda -Lopez  313.224.2450
District 7 Gabe Leland  313.224.2151
 
Let them know that we are holding them accountable for how our public resources are being used

Action Alert! CBA Ordinance Review, Thurs May 22, 10am, CAYMC

CBAbuttonsAction Alert! The Community Benefit Agreement (CBA) ordinance will be reviewed in the Planning and Economic Development Committee tomorrow at 10 a.m. at the Coleman A. Young Municipal Center. Download a draft version of the CBA ordinance below.

Please plan to attend or to send someone from your constituency group.  It is important that we have a presence at this first committee hearing.

People’s Platform Members and our allies have contributed a lot of time and effort to getting the ordinance this far and want to make sure that our advocacy work continues to hold. Thank You!

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